Sunday, 24 April 2016

Seven Signs That Your Child Could Have ADHD


ADHD (or attention deficit hyperactivity disorder) is a complicated issue that can affect a person's ability to function in a variety of success in school and with interpersonal relationships. Usually, the disorder is diagnosed by the time a child reaches their teenage years. There are some unmistakable symptoms of the disorder and others that are hard to decipher. Either way, being aware of them can help you know what to keep an eye out for. Here are seven signs that your child could have it.
 
  • Self-Centeredness
  • Emotional Outbursts
  • Trouble Sitting Still Could Mean ADHD
  • Starting Things but Not Finishing Them
  • A Hard Time Repeating Things Back
  • Careless Mistakes
  • ADHD Doesn't Always Mean Loud
 

 
  • About 1 percent of the world population has autismspectrum disorder. (CDC, 2014)
  • Prevalence in the United States is estimated at 1 in 68 births. (CDC, 2014)
  • More than 3.5 million Americans live with an autismspectrum disorder. (Buescher et al., 2014)
  • Prevalence of autism in U.S. children increased by 119.4 percent from 2000 (1 in 150) to 2010 (1 in 68). (CDC, 2014) Autism is the fastest-growing developmental disability. (CDC, 2008)
  • Prevalence has increased by 6-15 percent each year from 2002 to 2010. (Based on biennial numbers from the CDC)
  • Autism services cost U.S. citizens $236-262 billion annually. (Buescher et al., 2014)
 Dr. Janet Lintala is the Author "The Un-Prescription for Autism: A Natural Approach for a Calmer, Happier, and More Focused Child" and the Founder of Autism Health, Pllc. (http://www.loveautismhealth.com). Janet is also the mother of three boys with a variety of issues such as Asperger syndrome, Tourette disorder, OCD, anxiety and ADHD.  Janet has a B.S. in Genetics, and graduated as a Doctor of Chiropractic, Salutatorian, summa cum laude, from The National University of Health Sciences. She completed two Mentorships at the RIMLAND Center under Dr. Elizabeth Mumper, M.D., the former Medical Director of The Autism Research Institute.
 
Link to Janet's book:

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